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EATING OUT ANIMAL-FREE PHOTOS HACIENDA TAPATIA

Hacienda Tapatia






Categories
AFC GUIDES TOFU

Tofu Cloth Instructions

TOFU CLOTH INSTRUCTIONS

  • ClipBoard: After a few years, my tofu cloth made from a polyester curtain sprang some holes. Since I didn’t have any spare curtain fabric, I used instead one of Steve’s old white cotton T-shirts. It work just as fine.

For many recipes you’ll want to squeeze the liquid out of the block of tofu before using it in those recipes. For years I used paper towels. One day when out of paper towels, I cut a round out of a sheer white curtain that was quite a bit larger than the block of tofu. I placed the tofu in the middle, brought the fabric up around the tofu till it hung like a ball from a rope. Then I twisted it round and round as the twist in the fabric squeezed the tofu into a ball, then I twisted as hard as I could to extract all of the liquid. It worked perfectly, and I’ve been using my handy little tofu cloth ever since.

After using tofu cloth, soak in water immediately till you’re ready to clean it, so that the particles don’t stick to the fabric. Wash in hot soapy water, making sure to thoroughly clean then thoroughly rinse. It saves money on paper towels; you always have it handy and it does a superb job in squeezing the tofu.

If you’re using paper towels to squeeze the tofu, wrap in several layers of paper towels. Squeeze to extract the excess liquid, unwrap and use as directed in the recipe.

If you don’t want to squeeze the tofu, because you’ll be using it for slices or cubes, then wrap tofu in a clean kitchen towel and gently press all sides, then let set for a few minutes to absorb excess fluid. If you want to dry the tofu further, then place a brick encased in a gallon size plastic storage bag, on top of the towel-wrapped tofu for an hour, then flip the tofu block over and do the same to the other side.

A new way I’ve started to use to extract the water:

I rinse the tofu block when I get it home from grocery, then wrap it in a couple layers of paper towels, then wrap it in 2 square dish cloths – the ones you wash dishes with (clean and dry). Then I place it in the refrigerator till ready to use. I do this with both Silken style and water-packed. It works beautifully.

A tofu cloth also works well to extract excess liquid from cooked or canned vegetables when required for a recipe. Follow the same instructions. It works perfectly every time.






Categories
CHEF'S HELPER HERBS & SPICES

TASTE THE BLOOD

SMOKED PAPRIKA

SMOKED PAPRIKA is the key ingredient added to animal-free recipes tasting of blood. Other additives that enhance the smoked paprika thus the blood taste are garlic powder, dry mustard, turmeric and sea salt.

~ Sharon Lee Davies-Tight


AFC BLOOD RED ITALIAN SAUSAGE BURGER©

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Categories
AFC GUIDES

Replicating Recipes

REPLICATING RECIPES

It seems that some recipes, no matter how you prepare them, turn out perfectly every time. Other recipes, no mater how precisely you follow the instructions, turn out differently every time. The reason for this is that some recipes are more susceptible to variations (no matter how slight) than others. If you experience difficulty in achieving consistency in making a particular recipe from one time to the next, check the list of variables below. One or more may be affecting the outcome.

BRAND NAME. Generally, you get what you pay for. Thus, cheaper brands usually indicate inferior quality. If you change brands in response to what’s on sale, the difference in quality between brands might alter the outcome of the recipe.

CHANGE IN QUALITY AT THE FACTORY LEVEL. Perhaps you don’t change brands, but you notice differences in flavor, texture, color and/or aroma of your present brand. A factory may change their product in response to: a particular harvest (good or bad), availability of certain ingredients, price increases, consumer demand or changes in production procedures. If your present brand no longer satisfies you, then experiment with new brands until you find one that you like.

UNIFORMLY CUT INGREDIENTS. If you make three identical stews, but in one you chop the vegetables finely, in the second you dice them, and in the third you chunk them, each will turn out markedly different in terms of texture, flavor and consistency. So, when replicating a recipe, determine the amount of surface of your ingredients you want exposed during cooking, then stick with it from one time to the next.

RIPENESS OF PRODUCE. Different stages of ripeness respond differently to different stages of the cooking process. For example, the end product of cooking a green banana compared with cooking a fully ripened banana varies significantly, even when allowances are made for cooking times. As a fruit or vegetable matures, the chemical composition changes, and those changes, if not consistent with the requirements of the recipe, will alter its outcome.

COOKING TEMPERATURES. Low, medium or high won’t make much difference in some recipes, but those containing fragile ingredients, which are sensitive to subtle fluctuations, will respond adversely to the change. Don’t hurry the cooking by raising the temperature, nor prolong it by lowering it. Use what’s recommended.

LENGTH OF COOKING TIME. Any food which is cooked requires a consistent temperature for a specified amount of time to turn out correctly. Although each food is different in its demands, some require a more rigid adherence to a time-table than others. Rice, for example, is more sensitive to cooking times than legumes. Be precise in your time-table and see if it makes a difference.

SPEED WITH WHICH YOU COOK. Often, when making a recipe for the first time we do it slowly and meticulously, making sure to do everything just right. The second or third time, however, we speed up the process because of our familiarity with it, and we don’t take the same meticulous care. Cook slowly, methodically and with purpose.

ORDER OF INGREDIENTS. You need only to make a gravy without first moistening the flour to appreciate the importance of order in cooking. Once again, some recipes may not be susceptible, but others definitely are. If you’re having problems with consistency in replicating a particular recipe from one time to the next, it could be that you’re taking short cuts by either eliminating crucial steps (note that crucial need not be obvious), or changing the order in which you add ingredients. Backtrack and begin as you did the first time, or the time that it turned out just right, and your problems may come to light.

VARIATIONS IN TASTE PERCEPTIONS. Lastly, if you are reasonably certain that there is nothing different about the ingredients or the method used in preparing them, then it might just be that your taste perceptions are different from one time to the next. I have noticed that my own tastes vary according to the time of day, mood, degree of hunger, food or drink previously consumed, state of health, or speed with which I eat. Allergies, colds, smoking cigarettes, medications, alcohol, caffeine, excessive intake of salt, sugar or fats can also alter the perceptions of what we taste. So, to keep your taste buds in good tasting order: stay in good health; refrain from smoking cigarettes; drink alcohol that compliments your food; drink coffee after your meal. Keep your salt, sugar and fat intake within reason. And, of equal importance, keep those buds clean–brush tongue daily.

Further,  I’ve noticed that the older I get, the more flavoring I use.  I don’t know if that’s a function of age, or familiarity with the flavors over time. Over the counter medications and prescription drugs at any age can also affect your taste perceptions.






 

Categories
AFC GUIDES

DUMBING DOWN RECIPES

DUMBING DOWN RECIPES

I don’t dumb down recipes. Everybody does it in order to make the recipe sound as simple as possible. If I did it, I’d be defeating the purpose of teaching you the correct way, or at least the way I did it.

Dumbing down a recipe leaves too much open for interpretation – too many questions you may have that go unanswered.

Take one recipe and have five different people make it, and they’ll all turn out differently. I know that in advance, so I try to take the guess work out of replicating a recipe.

Even though I give detailed instruction, some will not follow the instruction as presented, resulting in a different end product. That’s not on me.

As you become more proficient in replicating recipes, you can dumb them down yourself. When you do, you’ll discover what steps can be eliminated or not.

If a kitchen manager tries a recipe, likes it, and wants to give it to his/her cooks/chefs, then that manager can write it in a simpler way for them to follow.






 

Categories
WALK THE TALK

What Veggie Means Here

When I use the word “veggie” in my recipes or writing I’m referring to animal-free/plant-based. Veggie means vegetable. I am not referring to vegetarian, which usually means containing eggs and/or dairy. Eggs and/or dairy are not plants, so go figure on how the world now accepts eggs and dairy as plants.






 

Categories
CHINA CAFE EATING OUT ANIMAL-FREE PHOTOS

CHINA CAFE

EATING OUT ANIMAL-FREE

CHINA CAFE Cleveland, Ohio






Categories
EATING OUT ANIMAL-FREE

Restaurant Review Criteria

Pictures is how I do the review. Pictures of the food I order, eat and like. If I don’t like it, I don’t post it.

Animal-Free is the primary non-negotiable criterion. Service is not what I review. If a restaurant is so dirty that I can’t stand the smell of it, I’ll walk out as if I hadn’t been there.

I recommend a dish to you, through a picture, as a dish I liked, not as a dish I think you may like. I don’t know you nor your tastes. I only know mine.

Keep in mind that a pretty picture does not translate to a good tasting dish. In my own experience developing recipes, where I take pictures throughout the process, many a dish did not taste like the picture suggested through its beauty that it would. Those get scrapped. Will I make it again? Yes, but only after I’ve reworked the recipe, and only if the recipe is worth the effort. Sometimes it’s better to move onto another one.

Writing about the food in each restaurant gets in the way. Nobody is ever satisfied. She wrote a hundred words for theirs’ and only fifty for mine. His got a better sounding, a larger, longer applaud is a place I don’t want to visit.

I’m not out to destroy anybody. If I find out later that an item had something of the animal in it, I take down that picture. It’s on the restaurant to be honest.

If they consistently make mistakes for whatever seems to them to be a good reason, I’ll stop going, but will keep the review up on the site as a reminder of what the restaurant once was and could be again.

There is only one restaurant/bar that I barred from my site – and it was more due to the improvising of food handling procedures and being consistently out of the vegan food I ordered, that their menu claimed to serve.

In future I may decide to write a few words here and there. The only things written in stone are that it contain no animal products to get me to order it, and then to taste good once I’ve eaten it.

~ Sharon Lee Davies-Tight, the animal-free chef






 

Categories
EATING OUT ANIMAL-FREE

WALL OF FRIENDLY FACES

Northeast Ohio…and elsewhere.

CHINA CAFE WAITER 2







 

Categories
GROCERY STORES

HEINEN’S GROCERY STORE

Lots of vegan options in this beautiful store with beautiful people!

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EATING OUT ANIMAL-FREE PHOTOS EQUAL EXCHANGE ESPRESSO

EQUAL EXCHANGE ESPRESSO BAR

EQUAL EXCHANGE ESPRESSO BAR 

EATING OUT ANIMAL-FREE

Categories
EATING OUT ANIMAL-FREE PHOTOS THE MAIN SQUEEZE

THE MAIN SQUEEZE

THE MAIN SQUEEZE

EATING OUT ANIMAL-FREE

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EATING OUT ANIMAL-FREE PHOTOS RENAISSANCE HOTEL

RENAISSANCE HOTEL

RENAISSANCE HOTEL

EATING OUT ANIMAL-FREE

Categories
EATING OUT ANIMAL-FREE

TO ANIMAL CHEFS re: MENU PLANNING FOR VEGANS

Since there’s a lot of negativity directed at people who don’t eat animals, it’s in the interest of the animal chefs, who have to design restaurant menus that include animal-free (vegan) options for these folks, to grasp the reasons behind their commitment.

Viewing this well-made and respected documentary (Earthlings) helps the animal chef understand the decision they’ve made to abstain from engaging in the enslavement, torture and slaughter of other species by not buying, cooking and eating those who suffer. It is well-known and documented by those who experiment on animals, that they think beyond instinct, raise families, express emotions and feel fear and pain.